WATCH: Nats hit back-to-back-to-back-to-back HRs

Ben Krimmel
June 09, 2019 - 7:18 pm
Nationals hit four-straight home runs in the 8th inning to beat the Padres.

Denis Poroy/Getty Images

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San Diego Padres pitcher Craig Stammen just became the answer to a trivia question. And in this case, that is definitely not a good thing. 

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You see, Stammen had allowed just three homers on 1,167 pitches during the entirety of the 2018 MLB season, per ESPN Stats & Info. On Sunday against the Washington Nationals, he allowed four home runs in the span of seven pitches. 

And he did so in back-to-back-to-back-to-back fashion. Ouch. 

After a season filled with late-game disappointment, the Nats decided to make the 8th inning their inning with four consecutive big flies off Stammen en route to a 5-2 win to improve to 30-35 on the season.

After getting seven solid innings from Stephen Strasburg, fresh off the 9-year-anniversary of his big league debut, the Nationals needed a run to put him in-line for the win. And allowing just one run on six hits while striking out six is a quality start, it wouldn't be as sweet if it went down as a no-decision. 

After Yan Gomes grounded out to start the inning, Howie Kendrick hit his 11th HR of the year to give the Nationals a lead.

And then Trea Turner said, "Hey, let's have a little dinger derby!"

And then Adam Eaton followed suit.

And then... Anthony Rendon, too.

And then it was dugout dance party time! 

How far were all those dingers? In a word: far. 

Kendrick's went 421 feet, Turner's 425, Eaton's 402, but the fourth homer from Rendon traveled only 391. (Sorry, Tony.)

The Nats went back-to-back-to-back-to-back for the second time in franchise history, after Brian Goodwin, Wilmer Difo, Bryce Harper, and Ryan Zimmerman took the Milwaukee Brewers deep in consecutive at-bats on July 27, 2017. This means Washington is the first team in MLB history do hit four-straight long balls on multiple occasions. 

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